DIY, Food, Mummy's Kitchen, Recipe, Singapore
Comments 3

Recipe: Beef Rendang (Rendang Daging)

I have shunned cooking Rendang from scratch for the longest period of time because I always felt that it is a difficult dish to accomplish. How on earth do I cook a dish till most of the ‘liquid’ has been absorbed into the meat and not burn the dish? I was so glad that in recent time, I took a bold step to embark on this dish. Once you get a hang of it, you will love to make your own rempah (spice paste) as it beats all the ready-made Rendang paste from the stores. It was definitely confirmed by my son when he remarked that my home-made Rendang taste so much better than those made from ready-made paste.

The beef which is slowly braised with the fried flavourful spices, paste, coconut milk, kerisik and shredded kaffir leaves will create an extremely delicious coating on the outside of the beef. As Rendang gets better over time, it will be wonderful if you can serve them the following day but mine has never lasted more than the day I cooked it. (It only shows how good they are!!) Beware, the taste will linger in your mouth and this will cause you to long for more…..

We love to hear from you so once you have tried this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments either via our blog or by joining our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog via the right side bar to get the latest updates.

 

Serves 5 to 6 persons

Ingredients    

Rempah (Spice Paste):

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10 shallots

4cm galangal

4 lemongrass (white part only)

5 cloves garlic

4cm ginger

10-15 dried chilies (soaked in warm water and seeded)

 

Spices:

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2 cinnamon sticks (about 1-inch long)

5 cloves

4 star anise

5 cardamom pods

3 lemongrass (cut into 4-inch length and crushed)

 

Other ingredients:

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800g beef, cut into small chunk of 3cm x 3cm

6 tablespoons cooking oil

1 cup thick coconut milk

1 cup water

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4 teaspoons tamarind juice (Soak the tamarind pulp in some warm water for the juice and discard the seeds.)

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8 kaffir lime leaves (very finely sliced)

6 tablespoons kerisik (toasted coconut) [Click here to find out how to make it at home]

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1 tablespoon sugar/gula melaka or to taste

Salt to taste

 

Method:

  1. Cut the spice paste ingredients into smaller pieces.
  2. Then pound with a mortar and pestle or blend them in a food processor until fine.
  3. Heat the oil in a non-stick pan/stew pot.
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  4. Add the spice paste, cinnamon, cloves, star anise, and cardamom and stir-fry them until aromatic.
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  5. Then add the beef and the pounded lemongrass and stir for 1 to 2 minute.
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  6. Next, add the coconut milk, tamarind juice, and water. Simmer on medium heat, stirring frequently until the meat is almost cooked.
    img_2989
  7. Add the shredded kaffir lime leaves, kerisik (toasted coconut) and sugar/gula Melaka. Stir to mix them well with the meat.
  8. Bring the heat to low and cover the pan/pot and simmer for 1 – 1 ½ hours or until the meat is really tender and the gravy has dried up.
  9. Add salt to taste. If not sweet enough, add more sugar to taste.
  10. Serve immediately with nasi lemak (coconut rice – Click here link for the recipe) or with lontong.

 

Enjoy!! 😀

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This entry was posted in: DIY, Food, Mummy's Kitchen, Recipe, Singapore

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Hi! My name is Josephine Go. I blog at BeyondNorm.com in a segment called Mummy’s Kitchen. I love to use fresh and natural ingredients in my cooking to promote healthy eating. Some of my recipes may not be in line with the traditional methods of cooking to the extent that some of the ingredients are different, but hopefully new recipes are being created in my style. I certainly hope that what I do will help guide kitchen first-timers on how to cook their first meal as well as further equip kitchen veterans with new recipes. My loving husband and two wonderful children are my best guinea pigs and critics. They have enjoyed (or endured) the food that has been served to them for all these years. Mind you, I did not know how to cook or ever knew that I could cook till I got married. So there is hope for everyone. If I can cook, you can cook. You will not know how good or talented you are until you put your hand in the plough.

3 Comments

  1. Pingback: How-To: Kerisik (Toasted Coconut) | Beyond Norm

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