All posts filed under: Food

Recipe: Char Kway Teow/Fried Flat Noodles (炒粿条)

Do you know the history of Char Kway Teow? I managed to get some information from the National Library Board, Singapore. Despite its Hokkien name, the stir-fried noodle dish is associated with the Teochew community and is believed to have originated from Chaozhou in China’s Guangdong province. Char Kway Teow began as a simple meal for the ordinary man, an uncomplicated dish of rice noodles fried with lard and dark soya sauce. Rice vermicelli was added to the original flat noodle dish, but this was later replaced by yellow wheat noodles. Wow, I am so proud to be a Teochew!! 🙂 Char Kway Teow has a reputation of being unhealthy due to its high saturated fat content. However, when the dish was first invented, it was mainly served to labourers. The high fat content and low cost of the dish made it attractive to these people as it was a cheap source of energy and nutrients. When the dish was first served, it was often sold by fishermen, farmers and cockle-gatherers who doubled as char …

Recipe: Nyonya Laksa

Generally, laksa consists of rice noodles or rice vermicelli with chicken, prawn or fish, served in spicy soup; the soup is either based on rich and spicy curry coconut milk, or based on sour assam (tamarind or gelugur). This popular dish can be found in Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, and even Thailand. When you alter the rempah (spice paste), or the broth with different ingredients, the laksa will taste different. Even the noodles can make a significant difference. In Singapore, Laksa is usually termed as Curry Laksa or Katong Laksa. Whereas in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, it is commonly known as Curry Mee. Back when we were living in Malaysia and I was pregnant with my son, I used to crave Curry Mee, and every day a bowl of Curry Mee was a must. No wonder my son loves this noodle and spicy food a lot. Hahaha. A good rempah is always the key to any good curry, and this Nyonya laksa is no exception. That is why I will always try to make my own rempah. …

Recipe: Thai Crispy Fish Topped with Chili Sauce (Pla Raad Prik)

Typically, Pla Raad Prik uses a whole fish, fried until crispy, and then covered with a sweet spicy sauce made from a few ingredients; garlic, palm sugar and chilies, fish sauce and tamarind paste. It is a very popular dish in Thailand that is often ordered for special occasions but it is really quite an easy dish to prepare at home. As I do not have a whole fish but only three slices of red snapper fillets in my freezer, I was contemplating whether I should cook this dish. Being a seasoned cook, I was very certain that I have all the ingredients and sure enough… Viola! A new dish was born in Mummy’s Kitchen! If you like this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments via our blog. We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you newbies or veterans. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page and subscribe to our blog. Follow us on Instagram and YouTube @beyondnormblog to get the …

Recipe: “Sembawang” Seafood White Beehoon/Vermicelli

Seafood White Beehoon was first made popular by You Huak restaurant in Sembawang, Singpaore. But in recent years, many others have started to serve it in hawker centres. Some of my friends have tried from various places and complained that it was quite bland while others were crazy about it. This is a fairly easy dish to prepare and is an ideal one pan dish for a family dinner or gathering. The secret of turning bland beehoon into a tasty dish lies in a robust stock!! You may use any seafood to your own liking; from prawns, squids, and clams to crayfish, lobsters, and crabs!! As it is the first time my daughter is savouring this dish, she asked me while I was cooking if it will taste somewhat like Wan Tan Hor or Singapore Fried Hokkien Prawn Mee? Hmm… What do you think? For me to know and for you to find out. Her verdict was that the whole noodle dish tasted so flavourful and delicious that we do not have enough to eat!! …

Recipe: Assam Pedas Ikan (Spicy Tamarind Fish)

Assam Pedas literally means sour spicy. It is a classic Malay dish which is popular in both Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore. Traditionally, Assam Pedas calls for ikan tenggiri (Spanish mackerel) or ikan pari (stingray), but I used red snapper fillet instead. It is a very appetising dish as the gravy has the perfect balance of spiciness, sweetness and sourness that goes very well with steamed rice. Personally, this is a perfect one dish meal as various vegetables such as okra, tomatoes and/or brinjal/eggplants and pineapples may be added to the Assam Pedas. Making the spices/rempah from scratch was a tedious process but it was worth every minute of my time. The taste of the Assam Pedas still lingers in my mouth as I am penning down this post. Yummy!! If you like this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments via our blog. We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you newbies or veterans. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or …

Recipe: Sambal Stingray/Skate Wing on Banana Leaf (三峇魔鬼鱼)

Sambal Stingray is an Eurasian dish. Stingray was introduced into the Malaysian cuisine when the Portuguese traders brought it to Malacca. The stingray was then cooked with local ingredients. Malaysians and Singaporeans love Sambal Stingray, also known as Ikan bakar in Malay, is basically barbecued fish. It is marinated in an abundance of sambal paste and served with a good dosage of lime juice squeeze over it.  Sambal Stingray is one of our family’s favourite spicy food. When we just returned to Singapore a couple of years ago, we used to frequent a hawker stall in Ang Mo Kio which served a variety of seafood dishes including the sambal stingray.  Ever since I began to make my own sambal chilli, I always cooked it in the comfort of my home. I usually try to char the banana leaf so as to mimic a barbequed flavour for the fish. I load it with thinly sliced red onions and torch ginger in the cooking for added flavour. If you like this recipe, we hope that you could …

Recipe: Dry Bak Kut Teh (Pork Ribs Tea/肉骨茶)

Bak Kut Teh (BKT) in Hokkien (a Chinese dialect) literally means Pork Rib Tea. When I was a child, my mum would cook this herbal soup using the herbs/spices from the Chinese medical shop. Nowadays, most grocery stores and supermarkets in Malaysia and Singapore carry the sachets which contains the powdered herbal mix ready to be used. Being a strong advocate of healthy eating, I still prefer to use the loose herbs mix in this dry BKT dish. Reason? I once bought a packet of ready to cook BKT sachet and realised that there were preservatives in it. How disappointing! Klang town in Malaysia is famous for its BKT in soup form. Some years ago a dry version originated from this town and is now not only popular around Malaysia but also in Singapore. The BKT soup is dark and strong (with spices and herbs) in Malaysia whereas the soup is pale and peppery in Singapore. My family and I love the strong and robust flavours in this dry version; the additional ingredients are fried …