DIY, Food, Mummy's Kitchen, Recipe, Singapore
Comments 2

Recipe: Getuk Ubi (Cassava/Tapoica with Sweet Coconut Toppings -木薯糕)

Getuk Ubi or Pounded Tapioca Cakes; it does not matter what you name this kuih as this is one of the kuihs which I enjoy eating. As mentioned in my earlier post, Ubi Kayu (Steamed Cassava/Tapioca Kuih With Coconut), I am simply a lover of any kind of tapioca desserts. This kuih I know is fondly loved by the Malay communities in Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and Indonesia and I am sure even the Chinese and other communities loved it too!

Getuk Ubi makes a good afternoon snack or a sweet dessert for after dinner. When you sink your teeth into it, the intense flavour of the grated coconut and palm sugar balanced so well with the minimal flavoured cassava at the bottom… Mmm mmm, simply irresistible. I know, I know you will be tempted to have more than you should… BUT bear in mind, it is high in carbohydrates so eat it moderately. This is why I am making a minimal portion so that we will not overeat. Hahaha.

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Serve (according to your choice)

520g tapioca or Cassava

50g sugar

¼ teaspoon salt

 

Sweet Coconut Toppings

75g palm sugar or gula Melaka

15g sugar

40ml water

3 knotted pandan leaves

230g grated coconut

Pinch of salt

1 teaspoon corn flour

80ml thin coconut milk

 

Method:

Preparation of tapioca:

  1. Peel the skin off the tapioca.
  2. Rinse off the dirt from the tapioca.
  3. Cut into small pieces and transfer them into a dish.
    IMG_2002
  4. Steam the tapioca for 40-45 minutes or until soft.
    IMG_2028
  5. Sprinkle sugar and salt evenly into the steamed tapioca and mash while it is still hot.
  6. For a better texture, you can leave some tapioca in bite sizes.
    IMG_2013
  7. Do not forget to remove the fiber in the middle of the tapioca.
  8. Line a square or round pan with banana leafs. (I ran out of banana leafs so I left this step out)
  9. Pour in the mashed tapioca and press till firm and even.

Preparation of the sweet coconut topping (while the tapioca is steaming)

  1. Add the palm sugar, sugar, water and knotted pandan leaves in a saucepan.
    IMG_2007
  2. Bring to boil and stir until sugar is dissolve.
    IMG_2008
  3. Add in the grated coconut and coconut milk with corn flour.
    IMG_2009
  4. Stir until the coconut is drier and thicken.
  5. Spread the sweet coconut toppings onto the compacted tapioca.
    IMG_2029
  6. Ensure that it is also spread evenly and firmly.
  7. Cut into bite size and serve.

Enjoy! 🙂

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This entry was posted in: DIY, Food, Mummy's Kitchen, Recipe, Singapore

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Hi! My name is Josephine Go. I blog at BeyondNorm.com in a segment called Mummy’s Kitchen. I love to use fresh and natural ingredients in my cooking to promote healthy eating. Some of my recipes may not be in line with the traditional methods of cooking to the extent that some of the ingredients are different, but hopefully new recipes are being created in my style. I certainly hope that what I do will help guide kitchen first-timers on how to cook their first meal as well as further equip kitchen veterans with new recipes. My loving husband and two wonderful children are my best guinea pigs and critics. They have enjoyed (or endured) the food that has been served to them for all these years. Mind you, I did not know how to cook or ever knew that I could cook till I got married. So there is hope for everyone. If I can cook, you can cook. You will not know how good or talented you are until you put your hand in the plough.

2 Comments

  1. That’s also one of the Philippines’ favorite sweet snacks. Here in the US, every Filipino grocery store sells cassava, already grated. There are also tons of different popular cassava recipes, such as pichi-pichi…. or sometimes, Filipinos just boil the cassava, and eat it by dipping it in sugar.

    Like

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