DIY, Food, Mummy's Kitchen, Recipe, Singapore
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Recipe: “Sembawang” Seafood White Beehoon/Vermicelli

Seafood White Beehoon was first made popular by You Huak restaurant in Sembawang, Singpaore. But in recent years, many others have started to serve it in hawker centres. Some of my friends have tried from various places and complained that it was quite bland while others were crazy about it. This is a fairly easy dish to prepare and is an ideal one pan dish for a family dinner or gathering. The secret of turning bland beehoon into a tasty dish lies in a robust stock!! You may use any seafood to your own liking; from prawns, squids, and clams to crayfish, lobsters, and crabs!!

As it is the first time my daughter is savouring this dish, she asked me while I was cooking if it will taste somewhat like Wan Tan Hor or Singapore Fried Hokkien Prawn Mee? Hmm… What do you think? For me to know and for you to find out. Her verdict was that the whole noodle dish tasted so flavourful and delicious that we do not have enough to eat!!

We love to hear from you so once you have tried this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments either via our blog or by joining our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group. You can also like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog via the right side bar to get the latest updates.

 

Serves 4 persons

Ingredients

¾ to 1 packet beehoon/Vermicelli

2 eggs, beaten

4 garlic cloves, minced

 

Seafood:

16 pieces prawns, shell and devein (keep the head and the tail)

1 large or 2 medium squids, cleaned and cut into desired size

500g clams, soaked in salt water for an hour and then wash

8 stalks choy sum/green vegetables, cut into 2 inches long

 

Stock:

4 chicken carcasses

10 chicken feet

2 pork bones

½ cup of dried prawns, soaked to soften then drained

1 to 2 knobs rock sugar

 

Marinade:

1 tablespoon sesame oil

A dash of white pepper

2 pinches of salt

1 tablespoon Chinese Wine

 

Seasoning:

Fish sauce

Calamansi limes

 

 

 

Method

Preparation for the Stock:

  1. Put the bones in a pot of water and bring to a boil for 3 to 4 mins.
  2. Remove the bones and rinse them to get rid of the scum.
  3. Fill the pot with 20 cups of water and put the bones into it.
  4. Add dried prawns and the rock sugar, cover and bring it to a boil.
  5. Then reduce heat and simmer for 3½ hours, skimming off any scum that floats to the surface.
  6. Strain and set aside.

 

Marinating of the Prawns and Squid:

  1. Add the marinade into the prawns and squid.
  2. Set aside in the fridge for later use.

 

Preparation for the Beehoon:

  1. Soak the beehoon in a pot of cold water until the beehoon has softened.
  2. Drain and set aside.
  3. Heat wok with 2 tablespoons of oil and add in the garlic.
  4. Stir fry till fragrant.
  5. Add the beehoon to the wok. Drizzle some oil around the sides of the wok. Leave for one to two minutes before turning over. Remove and set aside.

 

Frying the Beehoon:

  1. Wipe the wok clean and add ¼ cup of oil.
  2. When the oil is hot, add in the beaten eggs and let it cook. If you like, you can quickly scramble the eggs.
  3. Before the eggs are fully cooked, add the stock and then the beehoon.
  4. Followed by the prawns, squids and clams.
  5. Give a quick stir and cover to simmer for 5 minutes or till the seafood is cooked through.
  6. Add in the green vegetables and mix in well till they are cooked.
  7. Finally add in the fish sauce to taste.
  8. Dish and serve with the calamansi juice on the beehoon.
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This entry was posted in: DIY, Food, Mummy's Kitchen, Recipe, Singapore

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Hi! My name is Josephine Go. I blog at BeyondNorm.com in a segment called Mummy’s Kitchen. I love to use fresh and natural ingredients in my cooking to promote healthy eating. Some of my recipes may not be in line with the traditional methods of cooking to the extent that some of the ingredients are different, but hopefully new recipes are being created in my style. I certainly hope that what I do will help guide kitchen first-timers on how to cook their first meal as well as further equip kitchen veterans with new recipes. My loving husband and two wonderful children are my best guinea pigs and critics. They have enjoyed (or endured) the food that has been served to them for all these years. Mind you, I did not know how to cook or ever knew that I could cook till I got married. So there is hope for everyone. If I can cook, you can cook. You will not know how good or talented you are until you put your hand in the plough.

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