DIY, Food, Mummy's Kitchen, Recipe, Singapore
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Recipe: Chinese Braised Noodles (Lor Mee) – 卤面

Lor Mee (in Hokkien) literally means Braised Noodles. The yellow noodle is soaked in a dark gooey sauce topped with yummy braised meat, eggs, bean curd, and other ingredients. Being a Teochew, when I was growing up I was always exposed to a more Teochew style of cooking from my mum. As such, I was never introduced to this noodle dish at home; hmmm… I wonder why?

Since I love braised dishes and black vinegar why won’t I love Lor Mee as well? With all the courage I had within me, I took a bold step and started making this noodle dish not only for my family and I, but for my friends as well. It was a huge success!! So glad I did it! 🙂 🙂

Don’t hesitate and try it for yourself if you love Lor Mee or if you are like me before, hesitate no more and just do it!!

We love to hear from you so once you have tried this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments either via our blog or by joining our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group. You can also like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog via the right side bar to get the latest updates.

 

Serves 6 persons

Ingredients

630g pork belly

½ tablespoon five spice powder

1 tablespoon superior dark sauce

8 hard-boiled eggs

2 firm bean curd

 

For Stock:

1kg of pork bones

100g prawn shells

5 slices of ginger

5 cloves of garlic, sliced

1 tablespoon oil

 

For braising the pork belly:

5 cups water

40g ginger cut into slices

8 cloves of garlic, lightly crushed

60g rock sugar

¾ to 1 cup superior dark soya sauce

1½ tablespoons five spice powder

 

For the gravy:

½ cup Chinese black vinegar

1 tsp salt (adjust to taste)

1 tbsp. sugar (adjust to taste)

2 eggs, lightly beaten

½ cup tapioca starch mixed with 1 cup water

 

For Garnishing:

200g yellow noodle with 30g bean sprouts per serving

12 fried wantons (homemade or store bought)

1 large fish cake (cut into slices)

Some chopped Chinese celery

Some Sambal Chilli

Fried shallots (optional – homemade or store bought)

Some black vinegar

 

 

Method:

Preparation for Stock:

  1. Rub some salt on the pork bones and set aside for 5 minutes.
  2. Rinse off the salt and transfer to a stock pot.
  3. Heat up oil in a non-stick pan and add in shallots and garlic and sauté till fragrant.
  4. Add in the prawn shells. Sauté for 3 minutes.
  5. Transfer them into the same stock pot as the pork bones
  6. Add 12 cups of water into the pot and bring it to a boil.
  7. Simmer for 1 to 1½ hour.

 

Preparation for the Pork Belly:

  1. Rub some salt on the pork belly and set aside for 5 minutes.
  2. Rinse off the salt and pat dry.
  3. Rub ½ tablespoon of five spice powder and 1 tablespoons of dark sauce on the pork belly and let it marinate for 30 minutes.
  4. Heat up a non-stick pan and add 1½ tablespoons sugar till caramelized.
  5. Transfer pork belly and coat one side first with the caramelized sugar and then turn to the other side.

 

Preparation for Braising:

  1. Add 5 cups water from the pot into the pan, which the pork belly is sitting in.
  2. Next add in the dark soya sauce, rock sugar, sliced ginger, lightly crushed garlic and 2 tablespoons of five spice powder and bring it to a boil.
  3. Add in hard boiled eggs and firm bean curd.
  4. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 to 40 minutes or until meat is tender.
  5. Remove the pork belly, eggs and bean curd to cool.
  6. Cut the pork belly into slices, half the eggs and cut the bean curd to slices and set aside.

 

Preparation for the Gravy:

  1. Strain and remove ginger and garlics slices from braising liquid.
  2. Add 4 cups of the pre-made stock to dilute the strained braising liquid.
  3. Add in the Chinese black vinegar portion by portion (taste as you add in as some might find it too sour. You might want to add less than ½ cup or might want to add more depending on your taste).
  4. Adjust taste by adding salt or sugar and bring it to boil.
  5. When the gravy is boiling, add in the beaten eggs gradually and use a big ladle to stir it in a circular motion as fast as possible. It will become an egg drop or egg flower soup.
  6. Next put 1 cup of cold water into the corn starch to form a solution and stir well.
  7. Then gradually pour it in to the hot boiling gravy. Keep an eye on this process. If it is too sticky, stop the addition. If it is too watery, add in more starch. Remember to stir the gravy continuously.

 

Preparation for Blanching:

  1. In a saucepan or pot, bring some water to boil.
  2. Blanch the bean sprout lightly, drain and set aside.
  3. Blanch the sliced fish cake lightly, drain and set aside.
  4. Blanch the yellow noodles for 2 to 3 minutes and immediately transfer them. Put it under a cold running tap to prevent it from becoming soggy.

 

Preparation for Assembly of the Noodle: (200g of noodles with 30g of beansprouts per person)

  1. In a serving bowl, put the blanched yellow noodles, bean sprouts, fish cake, braised pork belly, eggs, bean curd, and fried wanton.
  2. Add in the hot gravy; just enough to cover the ingredients.
  3. Garnish with the chopped Chinese celery and fried shallots (if using).
  4. Serve with some sambal chilli and some black vinegar (if needed).
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This entry was posted in: DIY, Food, Mummy's Kitchen, Recipe, Singapore

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Hi! My name is Josephine Go. I blog at BeyondNorm.com in a segment called Mummy’s Kitchen. I love to use fresh and natural ingredients in my cooking to promote healthy eating. Some of my recipes may not be in line with the traditional methods of cooking to the extent that some of the ingredients are different, but hopefully new recipes are being created in my style. I certainly hope that what I do will help guide kitchen first-timers on how to cook their first meal as well as further equip kitchen veterans with new recipes. My loving husband and two wonderful children are my best guinea pigs and critics. They have enjoyed (or endured) the food that has been served to them for all these years. Mind you, I did not know how to cook or ever knew that I could cook till I got married. So there is hope for everyone. If I can cook, you can cook. You will not know how good or talented you are until you put your hand in the plough.

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