All posts tagged: Chinese New Year

#BeyondNormEats: 15 Days of Chinese New Year Feasting

Now, there is no doubt that you are familiar with the 12 days of Christmas, thanks to pop culture. However, the 15 days of Chinese New Year is a festive season that stretches from the new moon on the first day of the lunar new year until the first full moon on Yuanxiao Festival (元宵节—yuán xiāo jié), which is also known as Chinese Valentine’s Day. This year’s Chinese New Year begins on the 25th of January and ends on the 8th of February 2020. Chinese New Year is a great reason to celebrate and strengthen family ties, and what better way to bond then over a good feast? We understand that picking a spot for the whole family to gather at can be a daunting task, so we curated 15 spots from the Quandoo app to suit your different needs! (Read till the end for a little bonus!) Classic Chinese Restaurants Yàn 宴中餐馆 @ National Gallery Singapore Located on the rooftop of the National Gallery Singapore, Yàn specialises in Cantonese cuisine inspired by the restaurant’s Chinese …

Recipe: Braised E-Fu Noodles with Shredded Chicken (伊府面)

Chinese New Year is the season where many of you are busy spring cleaning and shopping for new clothes and groceries. As such, I wanted to share a simple noodle dish to usher in the new year. During Chinese New Year, the noodles should not be cut as it symbolises longevity and happiness in Chinese culture. This is a fairly easy and delicious dish to whip up, especially during this busy period where there is so much to do and so little time. Instead of using Longevity noodles (长寿面 Chángshòu Miàn/chung-show myen), I decided to use e-fu noodles. Hope you give this recipe a try. We love to hear from you so once you have tried this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments either via our blog or by joining our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group. You can also like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog via the right side bar to get the latest updates. Ingredients: 3 stacks of e-fu noodles ½ chicken breast 200 grams of yellow …

Recipe: Cantonese Style Steamed Fish (粤式蒸鱼)

Fish is a must for Chinese New Year as the Chinese word for fish (鱼 Yú/yoo) sounds like the word for surplus/abundance (余). That is why during Chinese New Year, we will always wish each other “年年有余” (Niánnián yǒu yú /nyen-nyen yo yoo/) which means having abundance every year. Families who are particular with culinary symbolism will purchase and cook two fish. One will be eaten on the eve and the other was saved for New Year’s Day. It is important not to finish the fish completely, and to have leftovers which signifies abundance. If you are preparing Reunion dinner at home and are hard press for time or running out of ideas, why not try cooking this Cantonese Steamed Fish. It is one of the simplest dish to prepare and it taste like those served in a restaurant. If you have enjoyed our recipes, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback / comments either via our blog or by joining our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s …

Recipe: Poon Choi/Pen Cai (盆菜) – Method I

Reunion dinner is usually an important occasion for Chinese family members to get together for a big feast. (Sad to say some times due to the busyness the whole family only get to meet up once a year.) This year I have decided to bring forward our Chinese New Year celebration. Why? Because my daughter will not be with us during the Chinese New Year period. To make it special for us I decided to cook this popular dish, Treasure Pot also known as Poon Choi / Pen Cai (盆菜) which contains a good variety of ingredients which I believe will cater for all palates. According to tradition, Pen Cai was invented during the late Song Dynasty. When Mongol troops invaded Song China, the young Emperor fled to the area around Guangdong Province and Hong Kong. To serve the Emperor as well as his army, the locals collected all their best food available, cooked it, and because there were not enough serving containers available put the resulting meal in large wooden washbasins. (Adapted from Wikipedia). In Chinese Pen Cai literally means …