All posts filed under: DIY

Recipe: Dry Bak Kut Teh (Pork Ribs Tea/肉骨茶)

Bak Kut Teh (BKT) in Hokkien (a Chinese dialect) literally means Pork Rib Tea. When I was a child, my mum would cook this herbal soup using the herbs/spices from the Chinese medical shop. Nowadays, most grocery stores and supermarkets in Malaysia and Singapore carry the sachets which contains the powdered herbal mix ready to be used. Being a strong advocate of healthy eating, I still prefer to use the loose herbs mix in this dry BKT dish. Reason? I once bought a packet of ready to cook BKT sachet and realised that there were preservatives in it. How disappointing! Klang town in Malaysia is famous for its BKT in soup form. Some years ago a dry version originated from this town and is now not only popular around Malaysia but also in Singapore. The BKT soup is dark and strong (with spices and herbs) in Malaysia whereas the soup is pale and peppery in Singapore. My family and I love the strong and robust flavours in this dry version; the additional ingredients are fried …

Recipe: Sambal Petai (Stink Beans) Prawns Topped With Crispy Ikan Billis

When we were living in Malaysia, Petai (stink beans/smelly beans) was a common sight in the wet market or at most nasi lemak stalls. Back then, the price of Petai was cheap but now a pack 150g of Petai is selling for SGD4.00 in the wet market!! These beans have a very pungent smell because of the high concentration of amino acids in them.  To be honest, it was not love at first sight!! After realising there is a wealth of healthy nutrients in them, this dish is now one of our regular favourite home dishes. They have been proven to aid in everything from lowering blood pressure to relieving stress and warding off heartburn. This is an irresistible and simple dish to prepare and the smell is so strong but the taste is so good!! If you like this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments via our blog. We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you newbies or veterans. You …

Recipe: Spicy Beef Noodle Soup (Sichuan style)

I am a big fan of Sichuan noodles. I had my first authentic Dan Dan Noodle experience, when I was working in Xi’an, China in the early 90s, cooked by the chefs from Sichuan. I just love how the Sichuan peppercorns in the noodle creates a numbing sensation in the mouth. Sadly, my husband does not like this numbing sensation. 😦 The peppercorn is the signature ingredient in Sichuan style spicy food! Till now, I am still game for a bowl of good Sichuan spicy noodles but sad to say I have yet to find one that hits the mark. This is the reason why I am cooking this noodle: to satisfy my cravings. You can prepare the soup a day ahead, in my opinion this makes the soup taste better. I will share the Dan Dan noodle recipe in another post. (Anyone keen?) If you like this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments via our blog. We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for …

Recipe: Wat Tan Hor (Smooth Egg Gravy over Flat Rice Noodles/滑旦河)

One of my favourite noodle dishes is Wat Tan Hor. This is a classic and it is easily available at any Zhi Char stall or hawker center in Singapore and Malaysia. Wat Tan Hor is a Cantonese noodle dish and literally means smooth egg gravy over hor fun (flat rice noodles). The flat noodle is loosened and seared over high heat, then drizzled with soya sauce. I tried to create the wok hei but nothing beats the way this dish was cooked in the olden times when it was charred over a charcoal stove in the Zhi Char stalls. You will then make a lightly braised smooth egg gravy to pour over it. The overall result of the Wat Tan Hor I cooked was better than the ones that we bought from the Zhi Char stall near my home. Give it a try and you will fall in love with this noodle over and over again.  Remember to eat this noodle with some pickled green chillies. Although, my son prefers to eat it with sambal …

Recipe: Dry Wanton Mee/Noodles (干捞云吞面)

What do you do when you are left with some minced pork which is too little to cook a dish? I decided to make some wanton (dumplings) and cook some noodles to go with them. Voila! Wanton Mee!! This is a popular noodle dish in Asia. One version of this dish is served in a hot broth garnished with leafy vegetables, and wonton dumplings. Another version is a dry version mixed into a dark sauce.  Today, I am introducing the dry version and I am unsure of whether this is a Singaporean or Malaysian style but regardless, it is simply delicious!! Yum yum!! We love to hear from you so once you have tried this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments either via our blog or by joining our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group. You can also like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog via the right side bar to get the latest updates. Serves 4 persons Ingredients 4 coils of dry wanton noodles Some char siew (Store bought …

Recipe: Penang Hokkien Prawn Noodle (Har Meen/Mee Yoke/福建虾面)

I was drooling while writing out the recipe for this Har Meen. Mmmm…. I could smell the yummy prawn aroma from the broth. The flavour of this noodle is just unspeakable not to mention the tremendous amount of time and effort to put this recipe together. So I hope that after reading this recipe you will put in some nice comments in our blog for all these efforts to encourage me.  (Hahaha). This Penang Hokkien Prawn Noodle has a tinge of spiciness with a robust full flavoured broth made from loads of prawn heads and shells. This recipe has been tried and tested many times and is always given a thumbs up!! So remember next time, when you’ve shelled your prawns don’t throw away the heads and shell, keep them for this yummilcious noodle. 🙂 It will be a great motivation for me if you could provide us with some feedback/comments either via our blog or by joining our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group after you have tried this recipe. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or …

Recipe: Chinese Braised Noodles (Lor Mee) – 卤面

Lor Mee (in Hokkien) literally means Braised Noodles. The yellow noodle is soaked in a dark gooey sauce topped with yummy braised meat, eggs, bean curd, and other ingredients. Being a Teochew, when I was growing up I was always exposed to a more Teochew style of cooking from my mum. As such, I was never introduced to this noodle dish at home; hmmm… I wonder why? Since I love braised dishes and black vinegar why won’t I love Lor Mee as well? With all the courage I had within me, I took a bold step and started making this noodle dish not only for my family and I, but for my friends as well. It was a huge success!! So glad I did it! 🙂 🙂 Don’t hesitate and try it for yourself if you love Lor Mee or if you are like me before, hesitate no more and just do it!! We love to hear from you so once you have tried this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some …