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Tech Review: Sudio FEM – True Wireless Earphones

With an ever-increasing interest in true wireless earbuds, many companies have sprung up in attempts to fill this void at all sorts of price points. The Sudio FEM stands out with their first ever implementation of what Sudio calls ‘Environmental Noise Cancellation’. This feature is similar to Active Noise Cancellation but the only difference is that it cannot be turned on/off. The Sudio FEM is quite fittingly named, as ‘fem’ in Swedish actually means five, and this is the 5th wireless earbuds that Sudio currently has available on their store.

Sudio Fem Case

True to their familiar Swedish product design, the Sudio FEM is clean and minimalistic. The plastic case has a smooth rubbery texture that provides a nice feel and grip to it. Similar to the Sudio TOLV, it also features a brown string, so that you can secure it to a bag for easy portability. This is definitely a more elegant solution compared to the crassness of a carabiner clip. You might be wondering, “If I hang it on my bag like this, wouldn’t the earbuds fall out?”

Sudio’s solution to this problem comes from the very strong magnets embedded into the cover. It will definitely need to take a major hit before anything will come flying out of this case.

Sudio Fem Attached to Bag

Another welcomed change since the Sudio TOLV’s case, is that it now has USB type-C port with quick charging. Just 15 minutes of charge will give you an hour of playback! The USB type-C is slowly becoming the port of choice for many new electronics. This means that we will soon have fewer cables to carry around.

You can also watch our video review of the Sudio FEM here:

Now, let’s talk about the design of the earbuds. They are built from the same material as the case and have the same finish. The Sudio FEM has a much bigger footprint compared to the Sudio TOLV. It holds much more components, like the 2 microphones per side for the environmental noise cancellation. In efforts to maintain their clean and elegant aesthetic, they opted to use a touch button rather than a physical button. The touch button on both sides of this true wireless earbuds has quite a bit of functionality:

  • Press once on either side to play or pause music
  • Press twice on the left side to go to the previous track; and
  • Press twice on the right side to go to the next track

Sudio Fem Review

Even though the Sudio FEM has a bulkier build, it is well moulded hence allowing it to stay securely and comfortably in place, as well as provide a better fit. Whatever life throws at you, I don’t think you would be losing either side anytime soon.

In addition to its elegant aesthetics, it also has an IPX5 rating. This means that the Sudio FEM is resistant to accidental water splashes and can be used rain or shine, whether you’re working out or out and about.

The battery life on the Sudio FEM is pretty impressive. I was able to get 6 hours of constant playtime as advertised, on top of the additional two charges that the case holds. This adds up to a total of 20 hours altogether.

Sudio Fem Inside

Now that the impressive preliminary features out of the way, how does the Sudio FEM sound? At first listen, it was unexpectedly clear that it sounded nothing like the Sudio TOLV. Unlike its counterpart which provided more warm-sounding audio, the FEM’s audio mainly focused on the mids. This means that the vocals, pianos, and guitars all sounded good. While it does not have a deep and thumpy bass, the percussion sounded prominently tight in songs that were more bass-heavy. However, the separation was a little mushy and the vocals started to lose its clarity for songs that were more complex. In my opinion, the FEM excels better at acoustics and instrumentals.

The Environmental Noise Cancellation is pretty decent, as it removes most of the low rumble noise. I must say that I am still quite impressed by it as I used the FEM on a plane and felt that it removed about 70% of the noise pollutants.

Sudio Fem for Travel

Overall, Sudio has done a great job with the Environmental Noise Cancellation on the FEM. With the world around us being so hectic, it’s great to have this pair at hand so that you can isolate yourself and block out the outside world with your choice of music.

For SGD219, you can get your very own pair on Sudio’s website – and don’t forget to enter the discount code BEYONDNORM15 upon checkout to get 15% off and free delivery to anywhere in the world!

Recipe: Black Chicken (Silkie) Soup (药炖乌骨鸡)

All these times, I have shunned away from silkie (more commonly known as black chicken) as it is not the prettiest thing to look at or to touch. What changed my mind? We were invited for a food tasting session and lo and behold, the double-boiled black chicken soup was on the menu. (Thinking to myself, you can’t be kidding right?) We were each served a bowl of the soup. Initially, I was quite hesitant to taste it, but after plucking up all the courage I have, I took a sip of the soup and it wooed me over immediately by the aromatic and flavourful taste.

As black chickens are packed with iron, antioxidants, vitamins, and nutrients which are good for our bodies, I thought: why not share it with our readers to promote a healthier lifestyle.  Drink to health!!

Like and follow us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page and subscribe to our blog. Follow us on Instagram (@TheRealBeyondNorm) and YouTube (@BeyondNormEats), to get the latest exciting updates and videos.  We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you, whether newbie or veteran.

 

Serves 4 persons

Ingredients

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1 whole black chicken cut into 4 portions, skin off

3 slices ginger

3 to 4 bowls boiling water

Salt to taste

 

Herbs:

10g dang shen

10g sweet yu zhu slices

10g huai shan

6 dried longan

5g ginseng slices

8g wolfberries

5 pieces red dates

1-2 pieces golden date

 

Method:

  1. Clean and wash the black chicken. Then set aside.
  2. Wash all the herbs, drain, and set aside.
  3. Add water into a pot of your choice.
  4. Add in the black chicken, ginger, and herbs. Then bring to a boil.
  5. Reduce heat and let it simmer for 2½ hours.
  6. Add salt to taste.
  7. Serve with steamed rice.

Notes from Mummy’s Kitchen:

  1. The sweetness of the soup is derived from the dried longan and the golden dates. If you don’t like the soup to be too sweet omit the golden dates.
  2. You can replace the herbs accordingly to your liking.

Recipe: Lu Rou Fan (Braised Pork Rice Bowl (滷肉饭))

In recent months, I have been finding ways to cook one-bowl dishes that are not just flavourful but also nutritional for my family. These are especially convenient on Mondays when the market is closed and Tuesdays when I am going for my bible study.

This Lu Rou Fan is one of my latest findings. The best cut of pork to cook this dish is pork belly as it has the layers of fats and lean meat and can be cut into small pieces. The skin is highly recommended for this as it contains rich collagen. The meat is braised over low heat for a long enough period to create a savoury braised meat sauce that is bursting with flavour and melts in the mouth. Oh, don’t forget to add in the eggs into the braising sauce. We love them, but if you are not a fan, you can omit them. You can also add some blanched bak choy or green leafy vegetables of your liking to the rice bowl to make it a wholesome meal for the family.

I am so glad that I cooked this as it tasted even better than my usual Teochew Braised Pork with just the addition of some extra spices. It is definitely a must do again dish. Writing this recipe is already making me hungry!

If you enjoyed this recipe, you can like and follow us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page and subscribe to our blog. You can also follow us on Instagram (@TheRealBeyondNorm) and YouTube (@BeyondNormEats), to get the latest exciting updates and videos.  We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you, whether newbie or veteran.

 

Serves 4 persons

Ingredients

500g skin-on pork belly, cut into small pieces of 2 to 3 cm

2 teaspoons oil

15g rock sugar

6 cloves, lightly smashed

8 shallots, roughly chopped

10 dried shiitake mushrooms, soaked till soft and cut into small pieces

60ml Shaoxing wine

3 tablespoons light soy sauce

2 tablespoons dark soy sauce

Water, enough to almost cover the meat

6 to 8 hardboiled eggs, peeled

Some green leafy vegetables, blanched

 

For the spices (place them in a spice bag)

3 star anise

1 cinnamon stick

3 bay leaves

2 teaspoons Sichuan peppercorns

2 pieces dried tangerine peel

2 slices fresh ginger

 

Method:

  1. Bring a small pot of water to a boil.
  2. Blanch the chopped pork belly for 2 minutes. Drain and set aside.
  3. Heat the oil in a wok over low heat.
  4. Add the sugar and cook the sugar for a couple of minutes.
  5. Turn up the heat to medium-high, then stir-fry the onions and garlic for a minute.
  6. Add the mushrooms and stir-fry for another 2 minutes.
  7. Add the blanched pork, Shaoxing wine, light soy sauce, and dark soy sauce. Mix well.
  8. Add in the bag of spices, eggs, and water. Then bring it to a boil.
  9. Reduce the heat and let it simmer for 1½ to 2 hours.
  10. Then remove the bag of spices and turn up the heat to thicken the sauce. Stir occasionally.
  11. When all the flavours are well combined several hours later, re-heat it and stir to prevent sticking. Then serve with steamed rice and the blanched vegetables.

Recipe: Curry Pig Skin with Chee Cheong Fun (咖哩猪皮猪腸粉)

Menglembu is a quiet and peaceful town in Perak, Malaysia. Interestingly, when you drive towards this town, you will see a few giant peanuts at the center of the roundabout. Once upon a time, there was a hidden food haven named Ma Chai “Twins” Chee Cheong Fun (CCF) which was one of the must eat food. The uniqueness of this CCF was that you can choose your favourite side dishes, such as sambal petai, sambal cockles, curry pig skin, wild boar curry, fried chicken and many more, as add-ons.  To make this dish even more flavourful, it was garnished with fried shallots and sesame seeds.  Sadly, when we returned to Menglembu recently, we discovered that the business has since closed.

Well, well… Now that we cannot taste this in Menglembu anymore, I was inspired to recreate this Curry Pig Skin dish to go with Chee Cheong Fun to continue our fond memories of this dish.

Like and follow us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page and subscribe to our blog. Follow us on Instagram (@TheRealBeyondNorm) and YouTube (@BeyondNormEats), to get the latest exciting updates and videos.  We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you, whether newbie or veteran.

 

Serves 3 to 4 persons 

Ingredients:

10 pieces Chee-Cheung-Fun 猪腸粉 (cut into strips)

1 pack baked pig skin

10 long beans (cut to 1-1/2 inch)

3 tablespoons curry powder

1 teaspoon turmeric powder

1 tablespoon minced ginger

1½ tablespoons minced garlic

2 tablespoons chopped shallots

Some Curry leaves

3 Lemon grass, cut into 3 sections

1-inch Belacan, toasted

800ml stock/water

150ml coconut milk

2 tablespoons cooking oil

Salt & sugar to taste

 

Garnishing (Optional)

Fried Shallots

Sesame seeds, toasted

Fried dried shrimps

 

Method:

  1. Soak the pig skin in water for about 15 minutes.
  2. Once it has softened, cut them into bite sized pieces. Set aside.
  3. Heat a pan and add in the cooking oil.
  4. Add in ginger, garlic and shallots. Fry till fragrant.
  5. Add in the toasted belacan, curry leaves, and lemongrass. Fry for a couple of minutes or till fragrant.
  6. Add in the pig skin and stir-fry for a minute.
  7. Pour in the stock/water, then cover and simmer on medium-low heat for 10 minutes.
  8. Add in the long beans and simmer for another 10 minutes or till the texture is to your liking.
  9. Remove the lid, then add in the coconut milk, salt, and sugar to taste. Continue to simmer until the gravy is slightly thick.
  10. Serve with Chee Cheong Fun and top with your garnishes (if any).

Recipe: Cheng Tng (清汤)

When we were kids, my late dad would bring us to places to have this cold, sweet dessert.  In those days, we did not have a refrigerator at home, so having this cold dessert was definitely a special treat for us.

Missing Dad plus the extreme hot weather recently, Cheng Tng seems to be a good option to combat the heat and bring me some good childhood memories.  For some of you who are not familiar with this dessert, Cheng Tng literally means clear soup. It is both light and refreshing.

Some might think that Cheng Tng is easily available at hawker centres or food courts, so why bother to cook it yourself. You need to bear in mind that many of the Cheng Tngs that you consume outside have a lot of fragrance essence added into it, which is why I prefer to cook it at home. I can also adjust the ingredients according to my preference. Feel free to share your Cheng Tng cooking experience and the preferred ingredients you like to use in the comments below.

Like and follow us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page and subscribe to our blog. Follow us on Instagram (@TheRealBeyondNorm) and YouTube (@BeyondNormEats), to get the latest exciting updates and videos.  We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you, whether newbie or veteran.

 

Serves 4 to 5 persons

Ingredients

120g lotus seeds

120g dried longan

50g dried white fungus

10 red dates

70g or more rock sugar (depending on your taste)

3 knots pandan leaves

2 litres of water

 

Method

  1. Soak white fungus and dried lotus seeds, separately, in warm water for about 10 minutes till they soften.
  2. Then trim the softened white fungus into small clusters and discard the stem portion. Set aside.
  3. Next, remove the green pith from the center of the lotus seeds to prevent the bitter taste when cooking.
  4. Add 2 litres of water and pandan leaves into a pot. Then bring them to a boil.
  5. Add in the white fungus and continue to simmer over medium-low heat for about 10 minutes.
  6. Next, add in the lotus seeds, dried longan, red dates, gingko nuts, and rock sugar into the pot. Simmer for another 20 minutes or till the ingredients soften.
  7. Remove the pandan leaves.
  8. Taste and see if it is to your liking, you can add more brown sugar if necessary.
  9. It can be served both hot or chilled.

Recipe: Black Sweet Vinegar Pork Trotter/Knuckle (猪脚醋)

Black Sweet Vinegar Pork Trotter is a classic, Cantonese heritage dish. It is a dish that has it all – sweet, sour, savoury and gingery. The pork trotter is stewed slowly over low fire in the tasty black sweet vinegar, and this makes the meat tender and succulent.

This is a post-natal dish which is believed to boost the immunity for women during confinement.  The natural collagen of pork trotters is very good for one’s health too.  The first time I tasted this dish was during my confinement month, after I had my second child. To be frank, yours truly did not really enjoy it then. Somehow this dish has a certain appeal to my husband, and especially my daughter. As I matured (hahaha) and my taste buds changed, I thought I should attempt to cook this dish for my family. I knew that even if I did not eat it, my family will!

I kid you not, now I have a different opinion of this dish: I love it, love it!! When I offered this dish for my mum to try, she was initially sceptical, but her end verdict was many thumbs up!!! I am sure it will become one of your favourite dishes too. 😊

If you like this recipe, be generous and give us some feedback/comments below. We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you, whether newbie or veteran. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page and subscribe to our blog. Follow us on Instagram (@TheRealBeyondNorm) and YouTube (@BeyondNormEats), to get the latest exciting updates and videos.

 

Serves 4 to 5 persons

Ingredients

1.4 kg pork trotter

600g Bentong ginger/old ginger (cut into chunks and smashed)

2 tablespoons sesame oil

1 bottle black sweet vinegar

750ml water

200g gula melaka

1 tablespoon salt

10 hardboiled eggs (optional)

 

Method:

  1. Cut the pig’s trotter into 2½-inch pieces. (Mine was cut by my butcher)
  2. Bring a pot of water to a boil.
  3. Lightly blanch the pork trotters in the boiling water for 2 minutes to remove any impurities.
  4. Drain and set aside.
  5. Heat a claypot or a pot, then add in the sesame oil.
  6. Add ginger and gula melaka. Then stir fry till fragrant.
  7. Next, add in the pork trotter pieces and coat well with sesame oil mixture.
  8. Add in the vinegar and the water.
  9. Add in the salt and bring it to a boil.
  10. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 1½ hours.
  11. Serve immediately with white rice.

Note:

  1. Preferably cook the dish ahead of serving time to allow the flavour to infuse into the meat thoroughly. Reheat before serving.

Recipe: Dry Rendang Chicken Noodles (aka Ipoh Dry Curry Noodles)

When you mention dry curry noodles, the famous Yee Fatt Ipoh Dry Curry Chicken Noodle will come to mind. This noodle has always been our family favourite and each time we visited Ipoh, we never failed to have it!!

As I was going to prepare some Chicken Rendang with the Dancing Chef Padang Rendang Paste, the first thing that came to my mind was this Dry Curry Noodle. Voila! My own version of the Ipoh Dry Curry Chicken Noodle was created.

If you like this recipe, be generous and give us some feedback/comments below. We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you, whether newbie or veteran. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page and subscribe to our blog. Follow us on Instagram (@TheRealBeyondNorm) and YouTube (@BeyondNormEats), to get the latest exciting updates and videos.

 

Serves 4 persons

Ingredients:

For the Rendang

1 pack of Dancing Chef Padang Rendang Paste

2 skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite size

4 stalks lemongrass, each stalk cut into 3 portions and slightly bruise

Handful kaffir leaves, crush

2 cups thick coconut milk

1½ cups water

6 tablespoons kerisik (toasted coconut) [Click here to find out how to make it at home]

 

For the Noodle:

800g yellow noodle

100g bean sprouts

100g char siew, sliced

Some mint leaves

 

For the Dressing Per Person:

1 tablespoon light soy sauce

1 tablespoon dark soy sauce

½ tablespoon oyster sauce

½ teaspoon castor sugar

dash of white pepper

 

Optional:

10 to 12 pieces of chicken skin

Salt

Pepper

 

Method:  

Cooking the Chicken Rendang

  1. Marinate the chicken with some of the Rendang paste for about 30 minutes.
  2. Add the Rendang paste, lemongrass and kaffir leaves and stir fry till fragrant.
  3. Add in the chicken pieces and combine well with the paste.
  4. Next, add in water and coconut milk and let it come to a boil.
  5. Stir in the kerisik.
  6. Lower the heat and simmer for 30 minutes.
  7. Add water as necessary as the end result of this rendang should not be too dry.

While the Chicken Rendang is cooking,

  1. Put all the dressing ingredients together in a small bowl and mix well. Set aside.
  2. Boil a pot of water. Blanch the bean sprouts, and then the yellow noodles.  Set aside.
  3. Season the chicken skin with salt and pepper.
  4. Add 1 tablespoon of oil on a non-stick pan, then shallow fry the chicken skin till crispy.
  5. Dish out and set aside.

For Serving:

  1. Pour the dressing sauce into a serving plate.
  2. Add the blanched noodle, beansprouts, and the sliced char siew or BBQ pork.
  3. Next, add the rendang chicken with the sauce on the plate of noodles.
  4. Top it with mint leaves and the crispy chicken skin and serve immediately.
  5. Enjoy the noodles by mixing all the ingredients with the dressing.

 

Review: Sudio TOLV – True Wireless Earphones

Since the release of Apple’s very own AirPods, wireless earbuds have been on a rising trend; as seen in this review, the new Sudio TOLV is the latest addition to the market. Thankfully, the industry has progressed greatly since the early days of wireless earbuds, where it was plagued with multiple problems.

The name Sudio is a combination of the words “Swedish” and “Audio” into a seamless name which reflects both their design vision and their promise to offer exceptional sound quality to music enthusiasts of every stripe – wayfarers, daydreamers, and storytellers alike.

As they develop as a company, Sudio is continuously looking for ways to improve their environmental impact. At present, they use PU and artificial leather for several of their products. They also ship their products from their factories to the respective warehouses by boat to reduce the amount of fossil fuels used during transportation. Through these ways, their hope to reduce the amount of waste created in the production process. It’s great to see a corporation such as theirs striving to play their part in corporate social responsibility issues.

DSC_0106

The TOLV is Sudio’s second truly wireless model and it has improved features that gives it a big advantage when compared to its predecessors. It has Bluetooth 5.0 connectivity which allows each earbud to be connected individually. That means that the earbuds can also be used one-sided, like a wireless Bluetooth ear set. In addition to that, the earphones only weigh 4.5 grams per earbud. It also comes in a redesigned portable charging cradle with matte rubber finishing.

Right from the get-go, the design is clean and minimalistic. Each side of the earbud has a simple button for all essential functionalities:

  • Press once on either side to play or pause music
  • Press twice on the left side to go to the previous track; and
  • Press twice on the right side to go to the next track

If you’re using it as a wireless Bluetooth earset, you could press once on the right side to answer the call and press and hold the button for two seconds to reject the call.

Now, for the part that all my fellow audiophiles have been waiting for… The bass for the Sudio TOLV is pronounced but not overpowering, whilst the highs are clean and crisp. The vocals are generally clear and concise, however with some tracks, they do sound a little manufactured. Overall, the Sudio TOLV produces a sound that appeals to most genres and is on the better spectrum compared to some of the other wireless earbuds out in the market.

DSC_0229

One of the problems that most wireless earbuds have is the fit. As we all know, ears come in different shapes and sizes. As such the earbuds may not fit securely in your ears. A good fit is an important factor as it does affect how it sounds and it helps prevent you from losing one side. So, if you get a chance, do try it out before you purchase! However, I’ve found that they fit me comfortably. And after literally jumping around (sorry downstairs neighbour) and shaking my head vigorously, the earbuds are still securely in place.

Something I really like is the simplicity of switching the Sudio TOLV on; all you need to do is to take the earbuds out of the case to automatically switch them on and place them back to switch them off. Gone are the days of needlessly pressing on buttons to turn the earbuds on and off!

DSC_0356

While the case is relatively small, it still manages to hold a charge of approximately 500mAh. However, I found it strange that the cradle is designed to rest flat on its back, but the charging port and the two battery indicator LEDs (the cradle’s battery level on the left and the earbuds’ battery charging status on the right) is also placed at the back. Hence, the Sudio TOLV is left to dangle and can never rest flat whilst being charged.

The earbuds itself has a really good battery life. Sudio claims that the TOLV has a total play time of 7 hours per charge, with 4 additional charges for a total of 35 hours. Through our own tests, after about 4-5 hours of usage, it still had about 40% of battery left.

DSC_0141

Overall, Sudio has done a good job on the TOLV – and for the price of SGD189, you can get your hands on one of your own!

Head on over to Sudio’s website right now to make your purchase – and don’t forget to enter the discount code BeyondNorm15 upon checkout to get 15% off and free delivery to anywhere in the world!

DSC_0181

Recipe: Puppy Duck (Kow Chai Ngap/狗仔鸭)

Is this dish cooked with dog or puppy meat? Be assured that no cute pets were being slaughtered in the process of cooking this dish. Hahaha. It is rumoured that this dish was named as such because it tasted like “dog meat”. Is it true? I’m not sure because I have not tasted dog meat myself so I cannot verify this. The duck is braised with tau cheong (bean paste), nam yue (red fermented bean curd), and the aromatic Chinese leek till is tender.

The first time I’ve ever tasted this dish was when my mother-in-law cooked it. It was so good and tasty that I cannot forget how good it was!! Though this traditionally Cantonese dish is delicious, but sadly it is not very popular. Oh well, I am not surprised if you have not heard of this before. I thought it would be a waste if I did not write down the recipe as I would love to continue to see this dish on our homecooked menu.

If you like this recipe, be generous and give us some feedback/comments below. We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you, whether newbie or veteran. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page and subscribe to our blog. Follow us on Instagram (@TheRealBeyondNorm) and YouTube (@BeyondNormEats), to get the latest exciting updates and videos.

 

Serves 4 to 5 persons

Ingredients:

1 duck, cut into bite sizes

1½ tablespoons light soy sauce

1 tablespoon corn flour

6 to 7 stalks of Chinese leeks, cut by slanting and separating the green and the white pieces

70g old ginger, smashed

2 pieces Nam Yue (red fermented bean curd) + 1 tablespoon the juice from the Nam Yue

1½ tablespoons bean paste

2 pieces tangerine peel (optional)

 

Seasoning:

1 tablespoon light soy sauce

7 to 10g sugar

2 tablespoons Shao Xing wine (Chinese cooking wine)

1 teaspoon sesame oil

 

Method:

  1. Rub the duck in salt and let sit for about 15 minutes.
  2. Rinse off the salt and blood from the duck pieces . Then drip dry.
  3. Marinade the duck pieces with the 1½ tablespoons of light soy sauce and the corn flour. Let sit for about 1 hour or more.
  4. In a wok, heat up 2 tablespoons of cooking oil.
  5. Add in the duck. Cook till fragrant and all the pieces are browned.
  6. Dish out and set aside.
  7. Using the same wok, add in the ginger and white part of the leeks. Then fry till fragrant.
  8. Next, add in the bean paste and nam yue and fry till fragrant.
  9. Add in the duck pieces and toss till they are mixed well.
  10. Add in Shao Xing wine and combine well.

 

At this point, I transferred all the ingredients into a claypot. You can continue cooking the dish in the wok if you wish.

  1. Add in enough water to cover the duck, the seasoning, and the red fermented bean curd juice. Then mix well.
  2. Bring it to a boil and cover the claypot/wok. Simmer under medium-low heat for about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Check the water level in the pot now and add water if needed.
  3. After the 1 hour and 15 minutes, add in the green part of the leeks and simmer for another 10 minutes.
  4. Serve with hot steamed rice.

Note:

If you like, you may add in some corn flour to thicken the sauce after step 12.

 

Recipe: Braised Napa Cabbage with Dried Scallops

I had half of a Napa Cabbage left in my fridge and I thought that it will be nice to cook up a delicious dish instead of just using it in soup. Braised Napa Cabbage with Dried Scallops was indeed a thumbs-up dish for our taste buds and tummies, the sweetness of the Napa Cabbage with the umami flavour of the dried scallops goes so well together.

If you are not a lover of Napa Cabbage, think twice as it has loads of goodness in them. Weight watchers will be happy to know that it is incredibly low in calories. There are many antioxidant plant compounds, Vitamins C, Vitamin K and loads of other benefits!

Nothing beats a home cooked dish that is cooked with loads of love.  Try out this easy and simple dish I am sure you will like it.

If you like this recipe, be generous and give us some feedback/comments below. We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you, whether newbie or veteran. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page and subscribe to our blog. Follow us on Instagram (@TheRealBeyondNorm) and YouTube (@BeyondNormEats), to get the latest exciting updates and videos.

 

Serves 4 persons

INGREDIENTS

½ Napa Cabbage Chinese Cabbage

1 tablespoon Oyster Sauce

60g Dried Scallops (small or medium-sized)

300ml Water

½ tablespoon Shao Xing Wine/Hua Tiao Chiew

Pinches of Salt (to taste)

Some Wolfberries

 

Optional

1½ tsp Corn flour

1 tsp Water To mix with cornflour

 

METHOD

  1. Rinse the dried scallops and place them in a bowl.
  2. Add 2 cup water and ½ tablespoon of cooking wine into the bowl and soak with the scallops for 20 minutes.
  3. Wash the cabbage thoroughly.
  4. Cut the cabbage leaves down the centre in half first, then stack the 2 halves over each other and cut again in half.
  5. Place the cut cabbage neatly into the frying pan.
  6. Next, mix the oyster sauce into the soaked scallops.
  7. Pour in the water and the scallops into the frying pan.
  8. Bring it to a boil and then lower the heat to braise the cabbage for about 10 to 15 minutes or till cabbage texture is to your liking.
  9. Taste and add some salt if needed.
  10. Garnish with wolfberries. Then serve immediately.

Note:

As usual, I did not add in the corn flour mixture. But if you want to, add the mixture in on Step 9.