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Recipe: Dry Bak Kut Teh (Pork Ribs Tea/肉骨茶)

Bak Kut Teh (BKT) in Hokkien (a Chinese dialect) literally means Pork Rib Tea. When I was a child, my mum would cook this herbal soup using the herbs/spices from the Chinese medical shop. Nowadays, most grocery stores and supermarkets in Malaysia and Singapore carry the sachets which contains the powdered herbal mix ready to be used.

Being a strong advocate of healthy eating, I still prefer to use the loose herbs mix in this dry BKT dish. Reason? I once bought a packet of ready to cook BKT sachet and realised that there were preservatives in it. How disappointing!

Klang town in Malaysia is famous for its BKT in soup form. Some years ago a dry version originated from this town and is now not only popular around Malaysia but also in Singapore. The BKT soup is dark and strong (with spices and herbs) in Malaysia whereas the soup is pale and peppery in Singapore.

My family and I love the strong and robust flavours in this dry version; the additional ingredients are fried dried cuttlefish, mushrooms and the chillies which gives it an oomph to our palate!!

If you like this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments via our blog. We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you newbies or veterans. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog to get the latest updates.

 

Serves 4 persons

Ingredients

For the broth:

600 pork shoulder ribs/pork ribs, Salt and rinse off after 5 minutes

800ml water

2 aniseeds

1½ inch cinnamon stick

10 cloves

15 cloves garlic, rinsed skin on/off

15 pieces of Wolfberry (gei ji), rinsed and drained

1 tablespoon thick dark soy sauce

1 tablespoon light soy sauce

 

For the dry BKT:

350 ml of broth

1 to 2 medium dried cuttlefish, soaked, drained and sliced into strips

6 pieces dried shitake mushrooms, soaked, drained and sliced thinly

2 pieces chilli padi

10 pieces dried chillies

10 ladies’ finger/okra, washed and sliced diagonally about 1cm thick

1 tablespoon light soy sauce

½ tablespoon thick dark soy sauce

Oil

Optional ingredients:

1 tablespoon sugar

Salt and pepper to taste

 

Garnishing:

Chopped Coriander

 

Method:

Preparation for the broth:

  1. Add the water into a pot and bring it to a boil.
  2. Add in the aniseeds, cloves and cinnamon stick into the boiling water.
  3. Simmer for about 2 minutes.
  4. Add in the pork, garlic, wolfberries, dark soy sauce, and light soy sauce.
  5. Simmer in low heat for 45 minutes.
  6. Remove the pork from the broth and set aside. Keep the broth for later use.

Cooking Dry BKT:

  1. Add some oil in a pan/pot, fry the dried cuttlefish for 30 seconds
  2. Then add the dried chillies, and chili padi until fragrant.
  3. Add in the mushrooms and stir for another minute.
  4. Add in the ladies’ finger and fry 30 seconds.
  5. Add in the pork (from Step 6). Fry for 2 minutes.
  6. Add in the broth till it adequately covers the ingredients. (Or top up some water.)
  7. Adjust the taste by adding in the light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, and oyster sauce. Bring it to a boil.
  8. Simmer until the gravy is reduced to the consistency which you like.
  9. When it is ready to serve, garnish it with the chopped coriander.
  10. Goes well with steamed rice.

Note:

  1. If you want your dry BKT to be spicier, you can cut some of the dry chilli into half.
  2. I used only the basic herbs/spices for this dish.
  3. If you prefer a firmer texture for the ladies’ finger/okra, add them in in at Step 14 halfway through the simmer.
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Recipe: Sambal Petai (Stink Beans) Prawns Topped With Crispy Ikan Billis

When we were living in Malaysia, Petai (stink beans/smelly beans) was a common sight in the wet market or at most nasi lemak stalls. Back then, the price of Petai was cheap but now a pack 150g of Petai is selling for SGD4.00 in the wet market!!

These beans have a very pungent smell because of the high concentration of amino acids in them.  To be honest, it was not love at first sight!! After realising there is a wealth of healthy nutrients in them, this dish is now one of our regular favourite home dishes. They have been proven to aid in everything from lowering blood pressure to relieving stress and warding off heartburn.

This is an irresistible and simple dish to prepare and the smell is so strong but the taste is so good!!

If you like this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments via our blog. We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you newbies or veterans. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog to get the latest updates.

 

Serves 3 to 4 persons

INGREDIENTS

50g Ikan Billis/Dried Anchovies

250g Prawns, shelled

150g Petai, halved

2 to 3 tablespoons homemade sambal/store bought

1 tablespoon Fish Sauce

Cooking Oil

METHOD:

Preparation for the Ikan Billis:

  1. Wash and drain the ikan billis.
  2. Pat dry.
  3. Heat up 2 to 3 tablespoons of oil in a pan.
  4. Add in the ikan billis and stir till it is golden brown and crispy.
  5. Remove from pan and set aside.

 

Preparation for the Petai:

  1. Split the petai into half.
  2. Remove any petai that has worms in them.
  3. Soak the petai in water for 5 minutes. Then drain and set aside.

 

Final Touches of the Dish:

  1. Heat a pan with 2 tablespoons of oil.
  2. Add in the prawns and fry for 30 seconds.
  3. Then stir in the beans for a minute.
  4. Add 1 tablespoon of sambal and stir till prawns and beans are well coated.
  5. If you want it spicier, add 1 or 2 teaspoons of sambal and continue frying.
  6. Season with the fish sauce.
  7. Add some water if it is too dry and cook for another 3 minutes.
  8. Adjust taste by adding some sugar or salt.
  9. Dish out on serving plate and sprinkle the crispy ikan billis on top. Serve immediately with steamed rice.

Enjoy a spicy meal!!

Recipe: Spicy Beef Noodle Soup (Sichuan style)

I am a big fan of Sichuan noodles. I had my first authentic Dan Dan Noodle experience, when I was working in Xi’an, China in the early 90s, cooked by the chefs from Sichuan. I just love how the Sichuan peppercorns in the noodle creates a numbing sensation in the mouth. Sadly, my husband does not like this numbing sensation. 😦 The peppercorn is the signature ingredient in Sichuan style spicy food!

Till now, I am still game for a bowl of good Sichuan spicy noodles but sad to say I have yet to find one that hits the mark. This is the reason why I am cooking this noodle: to satisfy my cravings. You can prepare the soup a day ahead, in my opinion this makes the soup taste better. I will share the Dan Dan noodle recipe in another post. (Anyone keen?)

If you like this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments via our blog. We would also like to welcome you to join our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group for food lovers like you newbies or veterans. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog to get the latest updates.

 

Serves 4 to 6 person

 

Ingredients

For the stock:

10 cups cold water

9 slices of ginger

4 stalks of scallions, washed and cut in half

850g beef chuck, cut into 1½ inch chunks

 

For the paste:

4 tablespoons oil

2 to 2½ tablespoons Sichuan peppercorns

2 heads of garlic, peeled and slightly crushed

2 large onions, cut into chunks

2 large tomatoes, cut into small chunks

6 star anise

5 bay leaves

½ cup spicy bean paste

½ cup light soy sauce (adjust according to your taste you may reduce or add)

1½ tablespoons sugar

1 large piece of dried tangerine peel

¼ cup Shaoxing wine

 

Other ingredients:

Noodles of your choice (Fresh or dried)

Green vegetables, blanched

Chopped scallions and cilantro, to garnish

 

 

 

Method:

 

  1. Fill one stock pot with 10 cups of cold water.
  2. Add the ginger, scallions, and beef chunks.
  3. Bring to a boil. Then immediately turn down the heat and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes.
  4. Turn off the heat and set aside.
  5. In a large wok or another stock pot, heat up the oil over medium-low heat.
  6. Add in the Sichuan peppercorns, garlic cloves, onion, star anise, and bay leaves.
  7. Stir fry till the garlic and onion chunks start to soften.
  8. Then add in the spicy bean paste and mix well.
  9. Next add the tomatoes and cook for a couple of minutes.
  10. Finally, stir in the light soy sauce, the Shaoxing wine, and sugar. Turn off the heat.
  11. Now scoop out the beef, ginger, and scallions from the 1st pot and transfer them to the wok or the 2nd pot.
  12. Once this is done, pour in the stock through a fine mesh strainer and into the wok/2nd pot.
  13. Place the pot over high heat, and add in the tangerine peel.
  14. Cover and bring the soup to a boil.
  15. Then turn the heat down to simmer for about 1½ hours.
  16. Turn off the heat and let it sit on the stove for another hour to let the flavours come together or leave it overnight if you are cooking in advance.
  17. When ready to serve, warm up your soup again and then cook the noodles.
  18. Divide the noodle among the serving bowls.
  19. Top the bowls with the beef and some green vegetables.
  20. Scoop the hot soup over each bowl of noodles.
  21. Garnish with the chopped scallions and cilantro and serve immediately.

 

Note:

 

  1. If you like your soup to be really spicy, you might want to crush some of the peppercorns or add more.
  2. If you have some leftover stock you may freeze it and defrost it when you want to use them in future.

Recipe: Wat Tan Hor (Smooth Egg Gravy over Flat Rice Noodles/滑旦河)

One of my favourite noodle dishes is Wat Tan Hor. This is a classic and it is easily available at any Zhi Char stall or hawker center in Singapore and Malaysia. Wat Tan Hor is a Cantonese noodle dish and literally means smooth egg gravy over hor fun (flat rice noodles). The flat noodle is loosened and seared over high heat, then drizzled with soya sauce. I tried to create the wok hei but nothing beats the way this dish was cooked in the olden times when it was charred over a charcoal stove in the Zhi Char stalls. You will then make a lightly braised smooth egg gravy to pour over it.

The overall result of the Wat Tan Hor I cooked was better than the ones that we bought from the Zhi Char stall near my home. Give it a try and you will fall in love with this noodle over and over again.  Remember to eat this noodle with some pickled green chillies. Although, my son prefers to eat it with sambal chilli.

We love to hear from you so once you have tried this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments either via our blog or by joining our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group. You can also like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog via the right side bar to get the latest updates.

 

Serves 4

Ingredients

600g flat rice noodles

2½ tablespoons light soy sauce

1 teaspoon dark soy sauce

Cooking oil

 

Prawns and squids:

16 medium prawns, shelled off and seasoned with some of salt and white pepper

2 medium squids, cleaned and cut into slices then seasoned with some salt and white pepper

2 pieces fish cake, thinly sliced

Choy sum or baby bak choy, rinsed and drained

1½ tablespoons minced garlic

 

For Sauce:

4 cups chicken stock/water

1½ tablespoons Chinese wine

1½ tablespoons light soy sauce, or to taste

1 teaspoon sesame oil

½ tsp sugar

Salt and pepper to taste

 

For Thickening the Sauce:

2 tablespoons corn/tapioca/potato starch mixed in 5 tablespoons cold water

2 eggs, beaten

 

Other ingredient:

Some cut pickled green chillies or sambal chillies

 

Method:

Preparation of the Flat Rice Noodles:

  1. Heat up 3 tablespoons of oil in a wok or 1 tablespoon in a non-stick pan.
  2. Loosen the flat rice noodles and divide them into small portion.
  3. Add a portion of the flat rice noodles into the wok/pan (if you can handle it, add all the flat rice noodles at one go) and stir fry for a minute over high heat.
  4. Add the light soy and dark soy and fry for another 2 minutes, allowing the noodles to sear until slightly charred.
  5. Transfer to a large serving dish/or individual bowls.
  6. Repeat Step 3 to 5 till all the flat rice noodles are charred.

 

Preparation of the Sauce:

  1. Heat up 2 tbsp oil in the wok/pan and fry the sliced meat until almost cooked. Then push aside. (If you are adding)
  2. Otherwise, heat up the oil and add the garlic to fry.
  3. Add the fish cake to lightly brown.
  4. Add the vegetables.
  5. Add the sauce ingredients and bring it to boil.
  6. When the sauce starts to boil, add the prawns and the squid.
  7. Adjust the seasoning and add more stock/water if necessary.
  8. Reduce heat and let the sauce simmer.
  9. Add in the starch mixture and stir till the sauce is thickened, add more starch mixture if it is still too watery.
  10. Turn off the heat.
  11. Add the beaten eggs and stir quickly until eggs start to cook and gravy turns opaque and creamy.

 

Serving:

  1. Ladle the gravy over the noodles.
  2. Add some pickled green chillies or sambal chillies and served immediately.

 

 

Note:

  1. Fresh homemade chicken stock is always the best. To make the stock you can use one chicken carcass, one onion (quartered), two small carrots, and 6 cups of water. Simmer for an hour.
  2. The gravy is to be thick enough (not watery) so that it can coat the rice noodles.
  3. I did not use any meat in this recipe but if you like you can always add them.

Recipe: Dry Wanton Mee/Noodles (干捞云吞面)

What do you do when you are left with some minced pork which is too little to cook a dish? I decided to make some wanton (dumplings) and cook some noodles to go with them. Voila! Wanton Mee!!

This is a popular noodle dish in Asia. One version of this dish is served in a hot broth garnished with leafy vegetables, and wonton dumplings. Another version is a dry version mixed into a dark sauce.  Today, I am introducing the dry version and I am unsure of whether this is a Singaporean or Malaysian style but regardless, it is simply delicious!! Yum yum!!

We love to hear from you so once you have tried this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments either via our blog or by joining our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group. You can also like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog via the right side bar to get the latest updates.

Serves 4 persons

Ingredients

4 coils of dry wanton noodles

Some char siew (Store bought or homemade)

8 stalks of green vegetables, washed, drained, and cut into half

 

Wonton filling ingredients:

A packet of wanton wrappers

100g of ground pork

100g of prawns, deveined and chopped into small pieces

Some chopped cilantro leaves

1 tablespoon soy sauce

½ tablespoon Chinese wine

1 teaspoon sesame oil

1 pinch salt

1 pinch pepper

 

Sauce (per serving)

1 tablespoons oyster sauce

1 tablespoon soy sauce

½ tablespoon dark soy sauce

½ tablespoon sesame oil

 

Garnishing:

Some chopped spring onions

Some chopped cilantro

Some homemade pickled green chilli or sambal chilli

 

Garlic oil:

4 cloves garlic, finely chopped (Alternatively, use diced pork lard/fat)

3 tablespoons cooking oil

 

Method:

Preparation for Wanton:

  1. Combine all the ingredients for the wanton (except wrappers) and mix well.
  2. Let the pork and prawns marinade for 10 to 15 minutes.
  3. To make the wanton you may refer to how I made mine here: https://beyondnorm.com/2016/07/31/teochew-keow-recipe/
  4. Set the wrapped wanton aside.

Preparation of Char Siew:

  1. Prepare the Char Siew with my recipe or get some store-bought cooked Char Siew.
  2. Slice it lengthwise and set aside.

Preparation of the sauce:

  1. Mix all the ingredients for the sauces together in individual bowls and set aside.

Preparation of garlic oil:

  1. Heat up the oil.
  2. Add the chopped garlic.
  3. Fry till almost golden brown.
  4. Dish up together with the oil and set aside.

Preparation for cooking the wanton noodles:

  1. Bring a pot of water to a boil.
  2. Blanched the vegetables till cooked and set aside.
  3. Add the raw wanton into the boiling water till cooked.
  4. Drain and set aside.
  5. Use a wire strainer and add in the loosen strands of noodle into the hot boiling water till al-dente.
  6. Then run it under cold running tap water for 5 seconds and dip the noodles in the boiling water again just to warm it up.
  7. Transfer the noodles into the prepared serving bowl/plate toss them in the sauce.
  8. Top the noodles with the wanton, char siew, vegetables, and garlic oil.
  9. Place some pickled green chilli or Sambal chilli at the side and serve immediately.

Recipe: Penang Hokkien Prawn Noodle (Har Meen/Mee Yoke/福建虾面)

I was drooling while writing out the recipe for this Har Meen. Mmmm…. I could smell the yummy prawn aroma from the broth. The flavour of this noodle is just unspeakable not to mention the tremendous amount of time and effort to put this recipe together. So I hope that after reading this recipe you will put in some nice comments in our blog for all these efforts to encourage me.  (Hahaha).

This Penang Hokkien Prawn Noodle has a tinge of spiciness with a robust full flavoured broth made from loads of prawn heads and shells. This recipe has been tried and tested many times and is always given a thumbs up!! So remember next time, when you’ve shelled your prawns don’t throw away the heads and shell, keep them for this yummilcious noodle. 🙂

It will be a great motivation for me if you could provide us with some feedback/comments either via our blog or by joining our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group after you have tried this recipe. You can like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog via the right side bar to get the latest updates.

 

Ingredients:

700g of yellow noodles (blanched)

300g of rice vermicelli (blanched)

For Broth:

1.5kg prawn heads and shells, rinsed and drained

100g dried prawns, rinsed and drained

100g ikan billis without the heads, rinsed and drained

6 shallots, quartered

5 cloves garlic, lightly crushed

1 inch of ginger, sliced

15 cups water

2-3 pieces of rock sugar (about the size of a small ping pong ball) or to taste

800g of pork ribs (cut into pieces)

Salt to taste

 

For Chili Paste:

100g dried chilies (deseeded and soaked to soften)

75g shallots (peeled)

50g garlic (peeled)

3cm length of a block of belacan

2 tablespoons of water

Salt and sugar to taste

5 to 7 tablespoons of cooking oil
Toppings:

500g prawns (shelled, deveined, blanched)

6 hard-boiled eggs (shelled and half)

Some fish cake (sliced and blanched)

Some kangkong (blanched)

Some bean sprouts (blanched)

Some fried crispy shallots

500g lean pork meat (boiled and sliced thinly – optional)

 

Method:

Preparation of Chilli Paste:

  1. Blend the chili paste ingredients (except the oil) until finely ground and well blended.
  2. Heat up the wok and add cooking oil.
  3. Add in the blended ingredients and stir fry for 5 minutes.
  4. Mix in pinches of sugar and salt to taste. Set aside.

Preparation for the Broth:

  1. Heat up the same wok (unwashed), add in a little oil.
  2. Add in the shallots, garlic and ginger and fry till fragrant.
  3. Add in the dried shrimps and ikan billis and fry for 2 minutes.
  4. Add in the prawn heads and shell and fry till aromatic. At the bottom of the wok you will see some good prawn stock.
  5. Fill a stock pot with 15 cups of water and bring it to boil.
  6. Transfer the fried shrimp heads and shell and simmer on low heat for about 2 hours or longer; until the stock has developed its flavour.
  7. Then strain the stock through a sieve and transfer the stock into another pot. Discard all the ingredients in the sieve.
  8. Bring the stock to boil again, add 2 cubes of rock sugar and the chili paste. The amount you add will depend on how spicy you want it to be.
  9. Add in the pork ribs and continue to boil in low heat for another 1 hour or longer; till the pork ribs are thoroughly cooked.
  10. Adjust the taste by adding salt or rock sugar, if required.

Preparation for Garnishing and Serving:

  1. Place a portion of yellow noodles, rice vermicelli, kangkong and bean sprouts in a bowl.
  2. Ladle hot stock over it.
  3. Top with pork ribs (or meat slices), sliced shrimp, and egg. Sprinkle with fried crispy shallots.
  4. Serve immediately with some extra chili paste to taste.

Notes:

  1. The above measurements are just a guide. Feel free to add or reduce the amount of noodles and seasoning.

Recipe: Chinese Braised Noodles (Lor Mee) – 卤面

Lor Mee (in Hokkien) literally means Braised Noodles. The yellow noodle is soaked in a dark gooey sauce topped with yummy braised meat, eggs, bean curd, and other ingredients. Being a Teochew, when I was growing up I was always exposed to a more Teochew style of cooking from my mum. As such, I was never introduced to this noodle dish at home; hmmm… I wonder why?

Since I love braised dishes and black vinegar why won’t I love Lor Mee as well? With all the courage I had within me, I took a bold step and started making this noodle dish not only for my family and I, but for my friends as well. It was a huge success!! So glad I did it! 🙂 🙂

Don’t hesitate and try it for yourself if you love Lor Mee or if you are like me before, hesitate no more and just do it!!

We love to hear from you so once you have tried this recipe, we hope that you could provide us with some feedback/comments either via our blog or by joining our Mummy’s Kitchen Facebook Group. You can also like us on Beyond Norm’s Facebook Page or subscribe to our blog via the right side bar to get the latest updates.

 

Serves 6 persons

Ingredients

630g pork belly

½ tablespoon five spice powder

1 tablespoon superior dark sauce

8 hard-boiled eggs

2 firm bean curd

 

For Stock:

1kg of pork bones

100g prawn shells

5 slices of ginger

5 cloves of garlic, sliced

1 tablespoon oil

 

For braising the pork belly:

5 cups water

40g ginger cut into slices

8 cloves of garlic, lightly crushed

60g rock sugar

¾ to 1 cup superior dark soya sauce

1½ tablespoons five spice powder

 

For the gravy:

½ cup Chinese black vinegar

1 tsp salt (adjust to taste)

1 tbsp. sugar (adjust to taste)

2 eggs, lightly beaten

½ cup tapioca starch mixed with 1 cup water

 

For Garnishing:

200g yellow noodle with 30g bean sprouts per serving

12 fried wantons (homemade or store bought)

1 large fish cake (cut into slices)

Some chopped Chinese celery

Some Sambal Chilli

Fried shallots (optional – homemade or store bought)

Some black vinegar

 

 

Method:

Preparation for Stock:

  1. Rub some salt on the pork bones and set aside for 5 minutes.
  2. Rinse off the salt and transfer to a stock pot.
  3. Heat up oil in a non-stick pan and add in shallots and garlic and sauté till fragrant.
  4. Add in the prawn shells. Sauté for 3 minutes.
  5. Transfer them into the same stock pot as the pork bones
  6. Add 12 cups of water into the pot and bring it to a boil.
  7. Simmer for 1 to 1½ hour.

 

Preparation for the Pork Belly:

  1. Rub some salt on the pork belly and set aside for 5 minutes.
  2. Rinse off the salt and pat dry.
  3. Rub ½ tablespoon of five spice powder and 1 tablespoons of dark sauce on the pork belly and let it marinate for 30 minutes.
  4. Heat up a non-stick pan and add 1½ tablespoons sugar till caramelized.
  5. Transfer pork belly and coat one side first with the caramelized sugar and then turn to the other side.

 

Preparation for Braising:

  1. Add 5 cups water from the pot into the pan, which the pork belly is sitting in.
  2. Next add in the dark soya sauce, rock sugar, sliced ginger, lightly crushed garlic and 2 tablespoons of five spice powder and bring it to a boil.
  3. Add in hard boiled eggs and firm bean curd.
  4. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 to 40 minutes or until meat is tender.
  5. Remove the pork belly, eggs and bean curd to cool.
  6. Cut the pork belly into slices, half the eggs and cut the bean curd to slices and set aside.

 

Preparation for the Gravy:

  1. Strain and remove ginger and garlics slices from braising liquid.
  2. Add 4 cups of the pre-made stock to dilute the strained braising liquid.
  3. Add in the Chinese black vinegar portion by portion (taste as you add in as some might find it too sour. You might want to add less than ½ cup or might want to add more depending on your taste).
  4. Adjust taste by adding salt or sugar and bring it to boil.
  5. When the gravy is boiling, add in the beaten eggs gradually and use a big ladle to stir it in a circular motion as fast as possible. It will become an egg drop or egg flower soup.
  6. Next put 1 cup of cold water into the corn starch to form a solution and stir well.
  7. Then gradually pour it in to the hot boiling gravy. Keep an eye on this process. If it is too sticky, stop the addition. If it is too watery, add in more starch. Remember to stir the gravy continuously.

 

Preparation for Blanching:

  1. In a saucepan or pot, bring some water to boil.
  2. Blanch the bean sprout lightly, drain and set aside.
  3. Blanch the sliced fish cake lightly, drain and set aside.
  4. Blanch the yellow noodles for 2 to 3 minutes and immediately transfer them. Put it under a cold running tap to prevent it from becoming soggy.

 

Preparation for Assembly of the Noodle: (200g of noodles with 30g of beansprouts per person)

  1. In a serving bowl, put the blanched yellow noodles, bean sprouts, fish cake, braised pork belly, eggs, bean curd, and fried wanton.
  2. Add in the hot gravy; just enough to cover the ingredients.
  3. Garnish with the chopped Chinese celery and fried shallots (if using).
  4. Serve with some sambal chilli and some black vinegar (if needed).